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A Medical Encyclopedia Dedicated to Science, Health, and Healing, Sharply Focusing on Natural Medicine     Blood Ecosystem                   

 
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The Blood Ecosystem

Majid Ali, M.D.

 

The blood is also a dynamic, diverse, and delicate ecosystem. It is far from a sterile conveyer belt for transport of nutrients and wastes from one body organ to another.

The bowel dumps into the bloodstream much good stuff (nutrients) and much bad stuff (microbes and metabolic as well as external toxins). In the bloodstream, hunter immune cells swallow and kill microbes. The blood from the bowel is directed to the liver via a separate system of veins called the portal system, where it is cleared of most toxins. Thus, the circulating blood represents an ecosystem sandwiched between the two other major ecosystems of the body. When the bowel ecology is badly battered by sugar overload, antibiotic abuse, pesticides, and other insults, it causes adverse effects which my colleague, Omar Ali, and I designated "oxidative coagulopathy"7 and which I discussed in the chapter entitled, "Oxygen: The Great Communicator." A similar set of conditions develop when the ability of the liver to detoxify toxins is exceeded and toxins back up in the blood.

The Blood Is an Open Ecosystem

In 1995, in RDA: Rats, Drugs and Assumptions, I introduced the concept that the blood ecosystem is an open ecosystem.9 This seemed necessary in light of my recognition that the circulating blood is not a closed and sterile stream. Rather, it is in a dynamic interface with the bowel ecosystem on one side and the liver ecosystem (along with other body ecologies) on the other. It is pertinent in this discussion to recognize that the bowel is estimated to harbor 50 to 100 trillion microbes at any time, a number similar to that of the total number of cells in the body. The author's microscopic studies suggest that the number of microbes that cross the bowel-blood barrier every day runs in tens of millions, perhaps in hundreds of millions. Indeed, in severe cases, as discussed in earlier chapters, I observed PLFs in the blood to outnumber red blood cells.

I discussed my reasons for assigning the circulating blood a place in the base trio of the Pyramid in the chapter, "Oxygen: The Great Communicator." For advanced and professional readers, I again recommend the article entitled, "Oxidative Regression to Primordial Cellular Ecology"8 for detailed biochemical and microscopic evidence for my view that the blood ecosystem not only provides the essential link between the bowel and liver ecosystems, but also a field of PLF kept in check by oxygen and tracked down by hunter immune cells when they grow. In OD states, the blood ecosystem also teems with PLFs and spreads the adverse effects of oxidosis and dysoxygenosis to every microecologic cellular and macroecologic tissue-organ ecosystem of the body.

 

Primacy of Erythrocyte in Vascular Ecology

*  Contrasting Views of the Erythrocyte

*  Structure of Hemoglobin

*  Erythrocyte Metabolic

The Erythrocyte and Redox Homeostasis

*  Oxidative Stress on the Erythrocyte

*   Hemolysis and Oxidative Stress

The Erythrocyte and Acid-base Homeostasis

The Erythrocyte in High-resolution Microscopy

Erythrocyte and Oxidative Coagulopathy

* Erythrocytic Nitric Oxide Biology

Erythrocytic Regulation of Vascular Dynamics

*  The Erythrocyte and Coordinated Adaptation of Oxygen Transport

Therapeutic Implication of the Primacy of Erythrocyte in the Vascular Ecology

 

Related Tutorials

Primacy of Erythrocyte in Vascular Ecology

*  Contrasting Views of the Erythrocyte

*  Structure of Hemoglobin

*  Erythrocyte Metabolic

The Erythrocyte and Redox Homeostasis

*  Oxidative Stress on the Erythrocyte

*   Hemolysis and Oxidative Stress

The Erythrocyte and Acid-base Homeostasis

The Erythrocyte in High-resolution Microscopy

Erythrocyte and Oxidative Coagulopathy

* Erythrocytic Nitric Oxide Biology

Erythrocytic Regulation of Vascular Dynamics

*  The Erythrocyte and Coordinated Adaptation of Oxygen Transport